I Hate to End the Year with a Fail, But…

This is a Fail, with a Capital F:

IMG_20181226_122627
The Japanese-style Top from “The Great British Sewing Bee From Stitch to Style”

I knew going in that this was iffy, but in the spirit of my “Sew Edgy” wardrobe plan, I wanted to take risks. It was a low-level risk, to be sure. I got this cotton burnout knit fabric on clearance this summer for $1.99 a yard. And this pattern is very simple, with only a front, back and cuff, so it was not an investment in time or energy. Here’s what the pattern pieces from “The Great British Sewing Bee From Stitch to Style” look like:

GBSB Japanese top
Great British Sewing Bee Japanese top

The issue for me had less to do with the style than with what I can only call lazy drafting. The top is not, in the end, a quality garment without some modifications I am not willing to make.

The pattern maker made three decisions that seem lazy to me, from least offensive to most offensive:

  1. The cowl is too shallow. It constantly wants to flip out and escape, and who can blame it? You can remedy this by redrafting the cowl to make it deeper. If you don’t want to do that, you might get away with sewing a small weight, such as a metal button, onto the apex of the cowl to encourage gravity’s assistance.
  2. The cuffs are designed in such a way that you need to hem them. If you are going to have a knit cuff, don’t you want one that’s finished and polished? A simple tube-style design doesn’t need hemming. You’d need to redraft this, of course, and I can’t be bothered.
  3. The back neckline is just a turn-and-topstitch job. This is always going to look amateurish and won’t sit flat. A simple neckband, like you’d have on any knit top, would work much better. You’d have to draft this, of course, and again, I can’t be bothered.

To be fair to the style, I have seen a few chic versions out there. I think it favors an inverted triangle or rectangle body type, not a pear such as myself.

The fit is hard to figure out – there’s a ton of ease at the bust and waist because of the dolman/batwing sleeve shape, to encourage the drape, then it’s close-fitting at the hip, and the hem is asymmetrical.

IMG_20181226_122621

The book provides only finished garment measurements. I chose my size based on the hip measurement, assuming I’d want a bit of negative ease there. I cut a size 14, because the finished hip for size 14 is 40-3/8 inches, and I have 42-inch hips. Maybe it’s too big? Maybe my fabric doesn’t drape as well as it could? Who knows!

If you have this book and still intend to try this top, I noted two errors in the instructions:

  1. For step #1 the text and the pictures do not match. The text is correct, the pictures are wrong.
  2. For step #5, the WIDE end of the cuffs need to be pinned to the sleeves, not the narrow end. DUH.

Finally, beware that this top is a tracing-paper and fabric hog. Because the front and back are each one giant piece, you will need to piece together your tracing paper, and this uses 1.5 yards of 60-inch wide knit fabric.

On the positive side, the pieces are so big that this top will be easy to recut into another top. I am thinking another Style Arc Creative Cate, or a MariaDenmark Kirsten Kimono Tee.

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Author: shoes15

I live in Connecticut, USA with my husband and my dog, in an old house outfitted with a sewing room, a garden, an orchard, and a big liquor cabinet.

6 thoughts on “I Hate to End the Year with a Fail, But…”

  1. Sorry this one didn’t work out for you! I agree with you this style doesn’t suit everyone . There’s a very similar one in Drape Drape that I think I’ve made three times and none of them have worked on me!

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  2. The pics must not completely reflect reality, as often happens, as I think this style is pretty on you. But I understand when something just doesn’t feel right, and the pattern flubs make it feel even worse. Here’s to a successful first 2019 project!

    Like

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